COURSE SYLLABUS OUTLINE
CJ 604 Advanced Theory of Criminal Justice
SPRING 2007 (200702)
CRN 1814
T 6:30-9:00 P. M. Smith Hall 418

Required Texts

American Psychological Association. (2002). Publication manual of the American Psychological
      Association (5th  ed.). Washington, DC: Author. 
Cullen, F. T., & Agnew, R. (Eds.). (2006). Criminological theory: Past to present-Essential readings
      (3rd ed.). Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing. [CA] 
Jacoby, J. E. (Ed.). (2004). Classics of criminology (3rd  ed.). Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland. [J]

 

Instructor Sam Dameron

Office: Smith Hall 781 Old Main 107

Office Phone: 696-2568 (Takes message anytime) 

Fax Number: 696-4348

Email: dameron@marshall.edu

Web Page: http://www.marshall.edu/criminal-justice/dameron.htm

 

Course Description

The course is designed to provide the student already familiar with the basic concepts of criminological theory the opportunity to examine in depth a selected set of theories.

 

Prerequisites

CJ 404/504, its equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

 

Computer Requirements

Students must have a computer or access to a computer. The student and computer must have Internet and Email capabilities. The computer also must have a word processing program with spelling and grammar checking programs.

 

Desired Learner Outcomes/Objectives

      1. Students will be able to analyze and critique original writings of criminological theorists. 
      2. Students will be able to break theories into elements which are and are not germane to the different criminological schools. 
      3. Students will be able to write a summary of the most important aspects of the theories. 
      4. Students will write and exchange summaries of articles with other students. Summaries will be well written and thought out. 
      5. Students will question other students about the theorist's articles. 
      6. Students will participate in group discussions. 
      7. Students will be able to critically access different theories. 
      8. Students will be able to synthesize new theories. 
      9. Students will be able to apply theoretical constructs to hypothetical or real situations.

 

Evaluation of Learner Objectives

       1. Students will be evaluated based upon their class participation in discussion weekly. They will be evaluated concerning their ability to answer questions and make relevant observations about theoretical knowledge, thought-provoking observations, critique and incorporation.

        2. Students will be evaluated based upon their questioning of students about the theories they are presenting. They will be evaluated based upon the insight of the questions as they pertain to theoretical knowledge, thought-provoking observations, critique and incorporation

      3. Students will be evaluated according to their abstracts of theories which they will provide for other class members. The abstracts will be graded according to content, grammar, spelling, punctuation and alternate placement in other theoretical schools (with explanation for said placement). Heavy emphasis will be placed upon the writing and APA style correctness.

     4. Students will be evaluated according to their brief presentation of theoretical schools and their arrangement of presenters. They will also be expected to participate in discussions and help their presenters.

     5. Students will be graded based upon their knowledge and application/critique of theories on written midterm and final examinations. The examinations will be set up to help students prepare for written comprehensive examinations.

      6. Students will be evaluated according to their synthesis and application of a new theory.

 

Abstract Guidelines

Each time a student presents a theory they will summarize the theory in 1-2 pages, single spaced. At the top of the first page will be their name on the left side, the school on the right side and then the title of the article completed in correct APA reference style. At the end of the abstract will be another section entitled "Alternate Schools." The student will place the theory in as many alternate schools as they can with the criteria for each placement.

 

Tenets of Attendance/Philosophy

      1. A student should recognize that one of the most important aspects of a college education is classroom attendance and participation. The value of this part of the academic experience cannot be fully measured by testing procedures. 
      2. Absences such as those resulting from illness, death in the family, or institutional activities (those approved by the academic deans, such as debate, artistic performances and athletics) are to be excused when a student reports and verifies them to the instructor. For such excused absences, the student should not be penalized (MU Undergraduate Catalog).  
       3. When students attend classes they are in a position to make significant contributions to their learning experiences and the learning experiences of other students by asking pertinent questions, making pertinent observations, and sharing information. When a student cuts classes they not only keep themselves from learning but keep other students from learning all that they could learn. Students should participate in a class and not just occupy a chair. Participation is evaluated according to the student's shown knowledge of the subject (5 pts), thought provoking observations (2 pts), incorporation of theories and meaningful critique (3 pts).  
      4. Students will be held accountable for all requirements and information covered in all classes, whether or not they attend. If it becomes necessary to give quizzes to spur attendance or learning, quizzes may be given and their results applied to any test scores, or applied toward any test scores, for a class. 
     5. Any materials due are due on the day stated. Un-excused absences will result in a reduction of 15 pts per class with any presentations, discussant and handout points also deducted. 
      6. All exams must be taken when assigned. If exams are missed, a 0 (zero) will be given for the exam. However, exams may be scheduled by the instructor if he is given prior notice or excuse as specified in the catalog and in the above tenets. 
      7. Abstracts (25 pts) will begin with the Abstractor's name in the left hand corner and the theoretical school on the right hand corner. Next, a correct APA Bibliographical Entry for the Chapter or Article will be placed two spaces down. The abstract (20 pts) will be next. It should be grammatically correct and one to two pages, single spaced. After the Abstract, alternate placement of the author's theory will be made with a brief explanation of why it could fit in other criminological schools (5 pts).  
      8. Discussants will be graded on their group discussion leading. Grades will consist of 15 pts. Introduction of the theoretical school and leading discussions will be 10 points, arrangement of presenters will be 5 pts. There must be some arrangement of presentations with a rationale. Having them go in the order of the syllabus will result in a zero for this portion of the grade.
 

      9.  Examinations will be taken during the periods designated in the syllabus.  The time allotted for exams will be set by the instructor and announced in class.  A student has that amount of time to take the exam and the time begins the same for all students.  If a student arrives late for an exam the student must complete the exam in the original time frame specified in class.  However, if any student leaves the examination before a student arrives to begin the exam, the late student will not be allowed to take the examination because it has been compromised by the student leaving.  A student who arrives after any student has left the examination cannot take the test and will receive a zero for the examination.  Deviations from this policy can be made if the student makes provisions with the instructor before the test date.

 

GRADES

GRADING CRITERIA

Points

Each

No. of

Grades

Points

GRADING SCALE

MIDTERM EXAMINATION

200

1

200

A 90-100%

797-885

FINAL EXAMINATION

200

1

200

B  80-89% 

708-796

PRESENTATIONS (QUESTIONS)

10

70

C 70-79%  

620-707

ABSTRACTS

25

7

175

D 60-69%  

531-619

DISCUSSANT

15

1

15

F < 60%     

<531

APPLICATION/RESULTS

10

2

20

 

 

NEW THEORY  (Abst. 25, Theory 25,

Pres. 15, Application 10)

75

1

75

 

 

PARTICIPATION

10

13

130

 

 

TOTAL

 

 

885

 

 

All readings for abstracting and summarizing and discussant schools will be picked during the first class period.

 

Course Schedule*

Source

Presenter

Week

Date

Topic/Assigned Readings

 

 

1

1/9

Introduction to the course

CA Introduction

 

2

1/16

Theory Overview & Research

 

 

 

 

1/8-1/12 Late Registration Schedule Adjustment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

1/16

The Classical School and Rational Choice Theories

CA Part I, X, XI, XII

Luke

3

1/23

An Essay on Crimes and Punishments-Beccaria

CJ 23-26, J 352-361

Luke

 

 

An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation - Bentham

J 105-108, or CA 23-25

Bo

 

 

The American Reformatory Prison System  -Brockway

 J 481-490

Sara

 

 

Modeling Offenders’ Decisions: A Framework for Research and Policy-Clarke & Cornish

J 109-118

Emily

 

 

The Deterrent Effects of Arrest for Domestic Assault – Wilson & Kelling

J 476-481

Lia

 

 

Reconceptualizing Deterrence Theory  - Stafford & Warr

CA 415-420

Bradford

 

 

Doing Justice: The Choice of Punishments – Andrew von Hirsch

J 373-380

Indira

 

 

Modeling Offenders’ Decisions: A Framework for Research and Policy – Clarke & Cornish

 

Erika

 

 

Crime as a Rational Choice - Cornish & Clarke

CA 421-426

Josh

 

 

Kansas City Preventive patrol Experiment – Kelling, Pate, Dieckman, & Brown

 

Courtney

 

 

Police Control of Juveniles – Black & Reiss, Jr.

J 433-439

Sara

 

 

Results

 

 Luke

 

 

Application

 

 Leslie

 

 

1/15 Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday

 

 

 

 

1/16 “W” Period Begins

 

 

 

 

Situational Crime Prevention - Clarke

CA 444-451

Bo

 

 

1/19 Application for May Graduation Due in Academic Dean’s Office

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

1/30

The Positive School & Individual Trait Theories

CA Part I

Erika

5

2/6

Criminal Man- Lombroso-Ferrero

J 141-156 or

CA 26-28

Emily

 

 

The Jukes: A Study in Crime, Pauperism, & Heredity-Dugdale

J 157-164

Sara

 

 

Feeble-mindedness-Goddard

J 165-171

Leslie

 

 

The American Criminal-Hooten

J 180-191

Bradford

 

 

Crime and Human Nature-Wilson & Hernstein

J 199-207

Josh

 

 

Unraveling Juvenile DelinquencyGlueck & Gluecks

CA 39-50 or

J 299-293

Courtney

 

 

Gene-Based Evolutionaly Theories in Criminology – Ellis & Waslh

CA 51-66

Bo

 

 

Personality and Crime: Are Some People Crime Prone?Caspi, Moffitt, Silva, Stouthamer-Loeber, Krueger, Y Schmutte

CA 67-75

Indira

 

 

The Individual Delinquent - Healey

J 172-179

Erika

 

 

A Theory of Race, Crime and Urban Inequality – Sampson & Wilson

CA 102-108

Bradford

 

 

Collective Efficacy and Crime – Sampson, Raudenbush, & Earls

CA 109-114

Kelly

 

 

Results

 

Sara

 

 

Application

 

 Lia

 

 

 

 

 

5

2/6

Social Ecology, Social Disorganization & The Chicago School

CA Part III

Emily

 

 

Differential Systems of Values – Shaw & McKay

CA 95-101 or

 J 240-253

Leslie

 

 

Environmental Criminology - Brantingham & Brantingham

J 61-70

Erika

 

 

Broken Windows: The Police and Neighborhood Safety- Wilson & Kelling

J 468-475 or

CA 463-474

Luke

 

 

Natural Areas - Parks and Burgess

 

 

 

 

Juvenile Delinquency and Urban Areas – Shaw & McKay

 

Emily

 

 

Results

 

 Erika

 

 

Application

 

 Sara

 

 

 

 

 

6

2/13

Social Learning Theories

CA Part IV

Luke

 

 

Laws of Imitation - Gabriel Tarde

Online Class Material

Sam

 

 

The Professional Thief - Sutherland

J 9-12

Bo

 

 

White-Collar Criminality - Sutherland

J13-18

Sara

 

 

A Differential Association-Reinforcement Theory of Criminal Behavior- Burgess & Akers

J 275-282

Leslie

 

 

A Theory of Differential Association – Southerland

CA122-125

Lia

 

 

A Social learning Theory of Crime - Akers

CA 134-146

Bradford

 

 

The Code of the StreetAnderson

CA 151-161

 Indira

 

 

Results

 

 Courtney

 

 

Application

 

Josh

 

 

2/9 Last Day to Drop 1st 8 Weeks Courses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

2/13

Subculture Theories

CA Part V

Bo

7

2/20

What is a Gang?-Thrasher

J 4-8

Erika

 

 

The Content of the Delinquent Subculture-Cohen

J 248-253

Kelly

 

 

Lower Class Culture as a Generating Milieu of Gang Delinquency.- Miller

J 254-267

Sam

 

 

Delinquency & Opportunity - Cloward & Ohlin

J 283-287

Courtney

 

 

Interpersonal Dynamics in a Simulated Prison – Haney, Banks, & Zimbardo

J 543-553

Erika

 

 

Thesis of a Subculture of Violence – Wolfgang & Ferracuti

CA 147-151

Lia

 

 

Delinquency in a Birth Cohort – Wolfgang, Sellin, & Figlio

J 44-51

Brddford

 

 

Outsiders - Becker

J 317-324

Leslie

 

 

Violence and the Police - Westley

J 411-418

Luke

 

 

A Sketch of the Policemen's "Working Personality - Skolnick

J 419-433

 Indira

 

 

Prisonization - Clemmer

J 506-510

 Sara

 

 

The Inmate Social System - Sykes & Messinger

J 521-530

 Indira

 

 

Pains of Imprisonment - Sykes

J 511-520

Josh

 

 

Results

 

 Emily

 

 

Application

 

 Bradford

 

 

 

 

 

8

2/27

MidTerm

 

 

 

 

2/28 Mid-semester, 1st 8 Weeks Courses End

 

 

 

 

3/1 2nd * Weeks Courses Begin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

3/6

Midterm Review, Anomie & Strain Theories

CA Part V

Leslie

 

 

Suicide - Durkheim

J 208-213

Bradford

 

 

The Normal and the Pathological - Durkheim

J 119-123

Lia

 

 

Social Structure and Anomie - Merton

CA 171-179 or J 214-223

Emily

 

 

Delinquent Boys: The Culture of the Gang - Cohen

CA 179-183

Lia

 

 

Delinquency and Opportunity - Cloward & Olin

CA 184-190 or J 283-288

 XXXXX

 

 

Crime and the American Dream - Rosenfeld & Messner

CA 191-200

 Josh

 

 

Pressured into Crime - General Strain Theory - Agnew

CA 201-209

 Bo

 

 

Results

 

 Indira

 

 

Application

 

 Courtney

 

 

 

 

 

10

3/13

Control Theories

CA Part VI

Indira

 

 

A General Theory of Crime -  Gottfredson & Hirschi

CA 228-240 or J 302-311

Josh

 

 

An Age-Graded Theory of Informal Social Control - Sampson & Laub

CA 241-253

Luke

 

 

Social Bond Theory - Hirschi

CA 219-227 or J 294-301

Josh

 

 

A Power-Control Theory of Gender and Delinquency - Hagan

CA 254-260

 Bradford

 

 

Techniques of Neutralization - Sykes and Matza

268-271

 Luke

 

 

Results

 

 Lia

 

 

Application

 

 Erika

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Labeling Perspective

CA Part VIII

 Courtney

 

 

Primary and Secondary Deviance - Lemert

CA 273-276 or J 314-316

 Erika

 

 

The Dramatization of Evil - Tannenbaum

J 312-313

 Sara

 

 

Crime, Shame, and Reintegration - Braithwaite

CA 277-285

 Bo

 

 

Defiance Theory - Sherman

CA 286-293

 Erika

 

 

Results

 

 Leslie

 

 

Application

 

 Indira

 

 

3/16 Last Day to Drop a Full Semester Individual Course

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

3/20

Spring Break

 

 

 

 

ACJA National Conference Wilmington, DE

 

 

 

 

3/19-4/27 Complete Withdrawals only

 

 

 

 

3/18-3/25 Classes Dismissed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

3/27

The Critical/Conflict Perspective

CA Part IX

Josh

 

 

Class Conflict & Law - Marx

J 124-120

Bo

 

 

Culture Conflict & Crime - Sellin

J 235-239

Sara

 

 

Group Conflict - Vold

Online Materials

 Leslie

 

 

Criminality and Economic Conditions - Bonger

CA 304-311

 Erika

 

 

Class, State, and Crime - Quinney

CA 312-317 or J 131-140

 Lia

 

 

Crime in a Market Society - Currie

CA 318-329

 

 

 

Crime and Coercion - Clovin

CA 330-337

 Luke

 

 

Conflict Labeling - Turk

Online Materials

 Josh

 

 

Peace Making Criminology - Quinney

CA 338-346

 Bradford

 

 

The Law of Vagrancy - Chambliss

J 391-397

 Courtney

 

 

Two Models of the Criminal Process - Packer

J 398-411

 Indira

 

 

Results

 

 Kelly

 

 

Application

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3/26-3/30 Advanced Registration for Summer Session Open for Currently Enrolled Students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

4/3

The Feminist Perspective

CA Part X

 

 

 

Sisters in Crime - Adler

CA 359-366

Courtney

 

 

The Etiology of Female Crime: A Review of the Literature - Klein

J 325-335

Josh

 

 

Girls’ Crime & Woman’s Place - Chesney Lind

J 336-346

Emily

 

 

Society of Women: A Study of A Women’s Prison - Giallombardo

J 531-542

Bo

 

 

The Gendering of Violent Delinquency - Heimer & Coster

CA 374-382

Leslie

 

 

Masculinities and Crime - Messerschmidt

CA 383-393

Josh

 

 

Toward A Gendered Theory of Female Offending - Steffensmeier & Allan

CA 394-403

Luke

 

 

Results

 

 

 

 

Application

 

 

 

 

4/2 Advanced Registration for Summer Session Open for All Admitted/Re-Admitted Students

 

 

 

 

4/4 Assessment Day: Daytime Classes Dismissed, Evening Classes 4:00 p.m. or Later Will Meet

 

 

 

 

4/6 Last Day to Drop 2nd 8 Weeks Course

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

4/10

Developmental Theories

CA Part XI

Lia

 

 

A Developmental Perspective on Antisocial Behavior - Patterson, DeBaryshe, & Ramsey

CA 495-501

Lia

 

 

Pathways in the Life Course to Crime - Moffit

CA 502-521

 

 

 

A Theory of Persistent Offending and Desistance from Crime - Laub & Sampson

CA 522-527

Sara

 

 

Characterizing Criminal Careers - Blumstein & Cohen

J 71-81

 Indira

 

 

Crime and Deviance Over the Life Course: The Salience of Adult Social Bonds - Sampson & Laub

J 82-90

 Courtney

 

 

Seductions of Crime: Moral and Sensual Attractions in Doing Evil - Katz

J 91-104

 Erika

 

 

Results

 

 Bo

 

 

Application

 

 Courtney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Integrated Theories

CA Part XII

Bradford

 

 

An Integrated Theoretical Perspective on Delinquent Behavior - Elliott, Ageton, & Canter

CA 537-550

 

 

 

Toward and Interactional Theory of Delinquency - Thornberry

CA 551-563

 Emily

 

 

Control Balance Theory - Tittle

CA 563-581

 Courtney

 

 

Why Criminals Offend: A general Theory of Crime and Delinquency - Agnew

CA 592-606

 Leslie

 

 

Results

 

 Josh

 

 

Application

 

Bo

 

 

4/9-4/20 Advanced Registration for Fall Semester for Currently Enrolled Students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

4/17

Victimology/Victim Precipitation, Final Review, New TheoriesLuke

 

Sara

 

 

The Criminal and His Victim -von Hentig

J 26-27

Luke

 

 

Victim-Precipitated Criminal Homicide - Wolfgang

J 28-36

Josh

 

 

Victim Blaming - Lerner

Online Materials

Sam

 

 

Results

 

 Bradford

 

 

Application

 

 Luke

 

 

 

 

 

16

4/24

New Theories, Applications & Review

 

Sam

 

 

4/23-4/27 Dead Week

 

 

 

 

4/23-5/4 Advanced Registration for Fall Semester for All Admitted/Re-Admitted Students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

5/1

Final Examination

 

 

 

 

5/5 170th Commencement Exercises

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Presentation schedule may vary due to students' interest or understanding.